I just pushed the first build of Serilog 1.3 to NuGet. This one includes a more flexible JsonFormatter and support for width specifiers in format strings. Not huge changes, but both called for obsoleting some existing methods, and with 1.2 at the venerable age of “.53” it was time to rev and get back to the nice simple version “1.3.1”.

It occurred to me that we’ve now hit the one year mark in the Serilog project. Version 0.1 was announced on March 29th, 2013 actually!

If there was any doubt back then of the viability of “yet another logger” in the .NET ecosystem, it’s been well and truly dispelled in my mind. Sixteen of us have now contributed to the project, and what’s most exciting to me is that the developers extending, using and discussing Serilog are some of the best and brightest I know. It’s the kind of momentum that makes me confident we’ll see more use and growth in the next year.

For those who follow it, the mention of structured logging as a technology to “trial” in the January 2014 ThoughtWorks Technology Radar is also a good indicator that Serilog is aligned with the facilities .NET developers will come to expect and use widely.

Our 1.0 came only six months ago, so these are still early days, but there are now 38 packages tagged “serilog” on NuGet, and despite the more-than-occasional glitches in the counter ;) the core Serilog package has over 7,400 downloads.

Visits to http://serilog.net are also looking healthy:

Serilog-One-Year

April’s been a visibly good month, with a lot of interest stirred up by a discussion on .NET Rocks! where I did my best to “get the word out” about how Serilog has totally transformed my thinking about logging.

If you’re using Serilog it would be great to hear more about how it has worked for you, and where you think the project should be aiming next - get in touch here or on our discussion list!